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posters

"It’s still the old patriarchal fear, or doubt, that women can do outstanding athletic performances. If they do, they can’t be real women. It’s that clear, it’s that prejudicial..." Bruce Kidd talking about the IAAF  & IOC's 'gender policing'.

In a previous post I spoke about how our immersion in a patriarchal society makes us blind to the existence of the biases that surround us, define our world view & even ourselves. Gender roles dominate our lives from the moment we are born. We are welcomed into the world with an "It's a boy/girl!" & from that moment forth that's the role we are assigned. Boys are wrapped in blue blankets, girls in pink & of course given 'suitable' names. His & hers toys & attitudes are bought & trained. Dirty, sweaty & bruised boys are praised while a girl in a similar condition is at best a 'tomboy'. This binary stereo typing leaves little room for the spectrum that is gender.

Female athletes face many hurdles on their way to the top that few male athletes are even aware of. It is seldom if ever enough to be excellent or even the best; you have to look good doing it too, in a stereotypical feminine way of course (certainly can't have them coming across as 'dykes'). Even then there is little chance of earning the same reward or even achieving the same fame as their male counterparts. It's difficult to achieve stardom when the media barely covers women's sports events & when they do it's often biased & sexualised. ...continue reading "Trivialising Female Athletic Performance"

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gender in equality for self-defence

“In today’s world, if a woman is assaulted, she cannot expect or depend on anyone to help or protect her but herself. Victim behavior is learned behavior... Women can stop rape. They can do so by learning psychological and physical skills effectively to fight back.” - Dr. Judith Fein, Feminist self-defence author.

In this post we'll take a look at the particular problems faced by each gender in self-defence situations. Remember that the majority of violence is personal, the attacker is known to the victim & it is perpetrated against women. That is not to say that men are more violent than women nor even that women don't commit heinous violent acts. It is often argued that with women violence manifests verbally / psychologically & that men would rather not report attacks by women when they do occur (battered husband syndrome). Both of those arguments hold some truth (does verbal violence = physical violence?) but even taken to extreme they don't account for the disparity. Rather I would argue that it is the perception that women are easy victims. ...continue reading "Gender In Equality for Self-Defence"